Tony Scott set out to help an old relative and ended up inventing the Eezy Flush

 Agnes is 91 Years old.  Her eyes are very dim and her fingers are weakened from years of encroaching arthritis. All of which gives her a problem in the bathroom: she can’t use the split-flush push-button mechanisms that are fitted to all modern toilets, including hers.

111Agnes, who is a still feisty and fiercely independent Geordie from the Tyne Valley, also happens to be Tony’s mother-in-law.  So a couple of years ago he tried to figure out a solution for her that wouldn’t break the bank.

Of course there were, and are, other products already on the market.  But they all fall into one of only two categories.  Either they’re electronic, so that waving your hand in front of a sensor on the wall triggers a solenoid to operate the flush.  Or they’re mechanical, with a series of rods linked to a foot pedal screwed into the floor beside the toilet.  Both types costs close on £200, and both require professional installation, which costs almost as much again.

Against such rivals, the new device had, above all, to be simple to suit Agnes’ needs: easy to fit, easy to clean and easy to use.

The obvious solution was to make some sort of plunger.  So that’s what Tony made in wood, using a short section of broom handle and two turned sections: one part shaped like a volcano with a hollow core; the other shaped like the head of a large mushroom.

 With the broom handle glued into the mushroom cap, it was a moments work to super-glue the volcano to the cistern, eyeballing its position so that the central hole was directly over the push buttons. Tony found that dropping the mushroom into the hole made it easy for Agnes to flush with the palm of her hand.

She was delighted.  Then about a year ago, Agnes spent some time in hospital after a fall.  When she came out, local occupational therapists came to see what rails and walking aids might help her to make her environment safer.  The senior OT spotted the device and was very impressed.

Tony then thought that there may be a wider market.  He had it patented and made a number of prototypes in plastic. 

These Eezy Flush protoypes were then field–tested by two London Hospitals and several community healthcare teams, all of whom applauded the idea.

 The Eezy Flush is now manufactured and distributed by Asep Healthcare throughout the UK and Europe.